Featured entries from our Journal

Details Are Part of Our Difference

Podcast Episode – Meir Statman

With the Recent Events in Ukraine, Should I Make Changes to My Portfolio?

Embracing the Evidence at Anheuser-Busch – Mid 1980s

529 Best Practices

Category: A piece we love

Volatility & Bananafish.  What?

As many investors scratch their heads about the current economy and global market conditions, some may question their long-term investment plan and the relevance of “taking the long view.”  Frankly, that’s human nature.  That’s our cave-person, fight-or-flight genetics kicking in.  Totally expected, as are our current market conditions when put into context.  While the following is a slightly longer read than usual, the payoff for reading (and thinking about the contents) are worth it.  Enjoy the analogy that ties together: volatility, bananafish, and your portfolio.  If you’d like to discuss the article further, simply call the office at 855-414-5500 or schedule time with us via this link.

Click here for the fantastic write-up by our friend Rubin Miller.

Rich vs. Wealthy

One of our favorite podcast guests, author Morgan Housel, wrote a piece about “rich” versus “wealthy.” We had to share the quote below that stands out to us.

I want to be rich, because I like nice stuff. But what I value far more is being wealthy, because I think independence is one of the only ways money can make you happier. The trick is realizing that the only way to maintain independence is if your appetite for stuff – including status – can be satiated. The goalpost has to stop moving; the expectations have to remain in check. Otherwise, money has a tendency to be a liability masquerading as an asset, controlling you more than you use it to live a better life.

For the full piece click here.

And if you can’t get enough of Morgan’s writing here’s more.

Normal Volatility

Imagine it’s a very still day, and you’re in a boat on the ocean.

There’s no wind.

No swell.

The water is as flat as a mirror.

The calm goes on just long enough for you to start to feel like it’s normal.

When a small wave finally comes… it feels big. When a regular wave comes… it feels huge.

As scary as it might feel, it’s important to remember that waves are normal.

In fact, occasional storms are normal.

And the last thing you want to do when you get into a storm is abandon ship.

Featured entries from our Journal

Details Are Part of Our Difference

Podcast Episode – Meir Statman

With the Recent Events in Ukraine, Should I Make Changes to My Portfolio?

Embracing the Evidence at Anheuser-Busch – Mid 1980s

529 Best Practices

Hill Investment Group