Featured entries from our Journal

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of Projected Tax Implications

Podcast Episode – Tammira Philippe

Future Equity Returns

Matt Hall Recognized for Thought Leadership

Nell’s Journey to Partner and COO of HIG

Author: PJ McDaniel

Is Financial Infidelity a Strategy?

 

 

“What’s clear… is that competing ways of spending—where one partner spends freely and the other doesn’t spend freely enough—can lead to serious conflict.” Hal Hershfield

At HIG, a considerable part of our job is helping couples discuss their finances openly and create their family’s plan together. Sounds simple – but we have seen the benefits firsthand. Our clients say having a third party help navigate this tricky topic can have a massive impact on their self-reported relationship satisfaction, as well as the likelihood of achieving their financial goals.

If you’re curious how you can level up your financial harmony at home, check out this piece by Hal Hershfield, courtesy of our friends at Avantis (an evidence-based mutual fund and ETF investment firm). Hal is a Professor of Marketing and Behavioral Decision Making at UCLA’s Anderson School.

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE FULL REPORT

Sunday is Pay Day – Earning an Allowance

 

As a father of three boys (5, 7, and 10) and an investment professional, I’m always finding new ways to teach my kids about taking the long view with their money, goals, and happiness. One habit that has worked hugely well for our family is the old-fashioned allowance. 

My wife and I try to instill in our children that we are a team, and together we make the household operate. The boys have typical responsibilities like putting their stinky clothes in a hamper, picking up their 1000 nerf gun bullets, or putting their dirty dishes in the sink (maybe even in the dishwasher). In exchange for their labor, the boys get paid. 

Every Sunday, after donuts, is payday. In the McDaniel household, $2 a week is the going rate for an A+ job taking care of your family responsibilities. Fall a little short; you get a little less. 

The benefits? We get to communicate our family values of hard work, kindness, and teamwork through direct experience. Also, great conversations: What they want to do with their hard-earned money – Do they spend it, save it, or give it away? How much goes in each bucket?

New York Times columnist Ron Leiber’s book, The Opposite of Spoiled, is a resource that I’ve found invaluable. Want more? Call, email, or set up a time to talk more about how we can help set your kids up for long-term financial success. 

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Featured entries from our Journal

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of Projected Tax Implications

Podcast Episode – Tammira Philippe

Future Equity Returns

Matt Hall Recognized for Thought Leadership

Nell’s Journey to Partner and COO of HIG

Hill Investment Group